Archives for posts with tag: kitchen design

One of the things I like the best about Ikea kitchens is the freedom to choose from all the different colours and textures to create something completely bespoke. That’s a luxury you don’t normally have at the budget-end of the interiors market.

Even if you’re limited on budget, a pick-and-mix system means that you can still show personality and creativity in your choices. There is really no excuse for putting together dull and uninspiring rooms.

What's the bigger crime, Ed? Admitting to your second kitchen, or that it looks like this?

What’s the bigger crime, Ed? Admitting to the existence of your second kitchen… or that it looks like this?

Recently, one of my clients was deciding between a Howdens Kitchen (which is sourced directly through your builder and not generally marketed or sold to the trade) and one from Ikea. We weighed up the pros and cons, but in the end the potential for choice and creative scope won through. I may write further about this decision process soon — it’s something I’ve worked through a few times with different people, with different outcomes. Anyway, we wanted something a bit individual for this kitchen design, and with a brief to create ‘something cool,’ I got going.

As you might be aware, Ikea has had a complete kitchen furniture upgrade – the trusty Faktum has been replaced by a more modern and flexible system called Metod.

Where do we start? Ikea's new Metod system is like creating a Lego model

Where do we start? Ikea’s new Metod system is like creating a Lego model

This means that the dimensions of the units now feel more boxy, the drawers are deeper, and your options for storage are more varied. You might like a sleek block of minimalist doors to hide your gadgets,

Behind closed doors: Ringhult reflect the light and hide the clutter

Behind closed doors: Ringhult doors reflect the light and hide the clutter

or to ditch the doors altogether and display all your kitchenware in neat shelves;

Horda blocks are basically cabinets without doors: stack them and fill them

Horda blocks are basically cabinets without doors: stack them and fill them

to create the ultimate country-style kitchen complete with cornicing and wooden worktops,

Classic features here show off the more traditional look

Classic features here show off the more traditional look

or to play around with different textures and pattern.

Glossy red Ringhult makes a bold statement, while the geometric dimples on the Herrestad wall cabinets add to the glamour

Glossy red Ringhult makes a bold statement, while the geometric dimples on the Herrestad wall cabinets add to the glamour

First I looked at colours. My clients wanted something modern and sleek: they had been considering glossy cabinets and bright colours. However when we looked through inspiration sites like Houzz and Pinterest (really useful exercise — you can surprise yourself), we realised they actually gravitated most towards the greys and whites, with more natural tones and wood accents.

Ideal kitchen style for top budget -- a good starting point/ Roundhouse kitchen featured on Houzz

Ideal kitchen style for top budget — a good starting point/ Roundhouse kitchen featured on Houzz

Creative mix of colours, use of different materials/ Kitchen by Whitten Architects, featured on Houzz

Creative mix of colours, use of different materials/ Kitchen by Whitten Architects, featured on Houzz

So we played around with those shades, and came up with an inventive pairing from Ikea’s selection — Bodbyn Grey and Brokhult.

The Bodbyn range at Ikea comes in a few shades, one of which is a mid-grey. The doors are featured with a simple carved insert, Shaker-style. But you don’t have to recreate a farmhouse when you use it.

Stylisheve does Bodbyn grey. Pared down and modern

Stylisheve does Bodbyn grey. Pared down and modern

Chic grey Bodbyn nestles in this open plan apartment/

Chic grey Bodbyn nestles in this open plan apartment/ Pinterest page by Thomas Strubreiter https://uk.pinterest.com/thomasnordic

Ikea pairs its Bodbyn with chequerboard tiles and industrial style accessories

Ikea pairs its Bodbyn with chequerboard tiles and industrial style accessories

Get more bling with your Bodbyn: Ikea's show kitchen sparkles

Get more bling with your Bodbyn: Ikea’s show kitchen sparkles

Brokhult is a wood effect finish with distinct striped markings: a little bit retro, unapologetically faux, with grey-hued tones and smooth texture.

Brokhult features heavily in this from Kitchens by Design LA

Brokhult features smartly in this from Kitchens by Design LA

Skonahem puts Brokhult in a nautical, driftwood-type of role

Skonahem puts Brokhult in a nautical, driftwood-type of role

I felt that putting these two together would warm up the potentially stark grey with a complementary wood accent. So I plumped for Bodbyn grey doors, with surrounds and end panels in Brokhult. One section of the room needed cupboards to surround the large American-style fridge. These cabinets in turn are wrapped around by the Brokhult, creating a neat stand-alone unit. I hope to get some photos of the finished room for you very soon, so you can see how well they work together.

Back in the design stage, having established the core colours and materials, we now had to draw together worktops, lighting, extra shelving, window coverings, flooring, taps, oven and splashback. I’ll take you through these next time — some beautiful products were bought and some careful decisions were made.

Until then, what are your thoughts on Metod? Have you installed this new style Ikea kitchen in your own home? What pick-and-mix successes have you had?

Designing a kitchen can be challenging. Where to put the main players on your culinary stage? Having a starting point is always helpful, something that can’t be moved, that is set (in stone).

Here is what we had to work with:

This looks like a useful place to stack a dismantled kitchen....

This looks like a useful place to stack a dismantled kitchen….

Hang on a minute, what’s that lurking behind all that chipboard and rubble?

Now that's a useful space to put something

Well that’s a useful space to put something

How fantastic! A lovely feature, a brick chimney place, sporting original soot from the old fires. Now, if I could just find a suitable appliance….

I went searching, and found a gorgeous ex-display Stoves ‘Richmond’ oven at a metre wide in a local independent appliance store, aptly named Affordable and Stylish, for a satisfying discount. I also managed to find a cool chrome and glass curved extractor fan which fitted the space perfectly (although the measuring of an arch proved too complex for my mathematical skills, so we’ll definitely chalk that one up to luck rather than judgement).

The end result?

Ind-rustic-rial (?) pairing... New nestles into old very comfortably.

Ind-rustic-rial (?) pairing… New nestles into old very comfortably

I do love this. The rest of our kitchen is quite simple and minimal so this brings an earthy touch of character – rustic meets the pared down lines of modern. My electrician drilled carefully through the brickwork at unobtrusive points to feed power through to the oven and the extractor. Of course you can’t channel wires in and plaster over exposed brick, so you have to plan things a bit more strategically. One day I might get around to stripping the bricks with some industrial cleaner, and varnishing them. But for the moment the patina of the house’s history is on display and somehow it doesn’t look out of place.

Kitchen character

Kitchen character

You might notice a little teaser in this photo of some other interesting ideas I’ve had whilst designing this kitchen. I’ll be back with more on this subject very soon!

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