Do you remember when I dared you to consider a bathroom suite that isn’t white? Well now all the building work is finished on my little ‘Pampas Project’ and my client is very happy with her soothingly calm-hued bathroom. I thought I’d share the pictures here with you, so you can appreciate what happens when we follow the path less ordinary….

This project was unusual not only because of the dusky green bathroom suite, but also because the family were turning one medium-sized bathroom into two small but perfectly-formed spaces. A family of four, including two teenagers, it’s unsurprising to discover that morning ablutions had become rather stressful. Now the traffic has been halved, and everyone gets where they need to be each day on time. I’ll show you the shower room another day, but suffice to say, my client decided on a completely different style for that room. Back to the Pampas: it works really well:

Naturally matched; tiles and floor complement the Pampas suite

Naturally matched; tiles, furniture and floor complement the Pampas suite

As you can see the shade of the suite is subtly picked up by the limestone-inspired tiles. They proved harder than expected to match – too pink and the suite looked garish, too green and the Pampas turned from soft sage to sludgy. We shopped around various sources for the furniture, but kept to a theme of cream paintwork (skirtings, door frame and bath panel) and bamboo-toned wood to tie all the elements together: there’s a mirrored wall cabinet just out of shot above which is edged in bamboo, and the little floor cabinet and the blinds are also bamboo. Even the floor is Amtico Bamboo.

Narrow spaces call for inventive solutions

Narrow spaces call for inventive solutions

There was very little space for a floor-based cabinet so in the end we went for one which is meant to be hung on the wall (wall cabinets are generally around 10cm deep so plenty narrow enough), and popped a couple of Ikea (Godmorgon) legs on it. Together with the curved glass corner shelves above the sink, the storage in this little room is actually rather capacious, and clutter is held at a minimum.

Neat and harmonious

Neat and harmonious

A large chrome ladder towel radiator fills in the wall space between floor cabinet and door. Always go for the largest towel radiator you can fit in. It keeps the bathroom nicely heated, and there’s enough space for a family’s worth of towels, too.

We had a few hiccups with the shower screen over the bath. It has a fixed panel and a fully pivoting door which provides a good long length of splash protection, but was frustratingly leaking at the hinge. The rubber finned seal at the bottom of the door didn’t quite cover a gap between the door and the hinge. However we managed a nifty and cheap fix by cutting the gripper of the rubber seal where it attached to the door, and shifting it along so that the outstanding fin covered the tiny leaky gap. It worked perfectly, and was very simple to do.

Reclaimed door and a cosy radiator

Reclaimed door and a cosy radiator

The door was a serendipitous gift from neighbours: they happened to be remodelling their house at the same time, and were happy to donate to my client the bathroom door (original) that they no longer needed.

So, the result — one relaxing bathroom carved out of a small space. The colours blend in together in a way which seems up-to-date, reminiscent of Farrow and Ball paints. There are no dramatic clashes or gold-tap blingerie (not that this might not have its place in a certain context) — because when you’re being bold, you need to know where to hold back.

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